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>> right now, the european union is in distress. what would a failed euro mean for the e.u. or for its largest trading partner, the u.s.? >> the '08/'09 financial panic/crash/great recession put tremendous economic financial pressure on the entire global economy, including europe. >> in the same way in which the collapse of lehman implied global shocks, a dissolve in the situation of the eurozone is going to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has n
's freedom we paid our parts for the iron curtain and champ named into the e.u. of those countries that lost so many figures to communists. contained in this history is a crucial point about britain, our natural character, our attitude to europe. britain is characterized, but above all by his openness. we've always been a country that reaches out that leads the charge in the fight for free trade and against protectionism. as today as it's always been. independent, yes, but open to. i never want us to put it to drawbridge and retreat from the world. i'm not a british isolationist, but i want a better deal for britain. i wanted better deal if the fantasy british prime minister for the future of the european union. a future in which wants and should want to play committed an active part. now some might then ask, why raise fundamental questions about the future of europe when europe is already in the midst to be deep crisis. why raise questions about britain's role would support in britain is already so did. there are always choices that they don't raise the difficult questions, but it is essent
david cameron promises to hold a referendum on the e.u. warning that a concession for the democratic leadership is wafer thin. >> if we don't address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >>> google could light a fire under u.s. markets today as the giant's fourth quarter profits top forecasts on higher ad revenues. >>> and here in davos, bank ceos fight back against regulators in an exclusive cnbc debate, apologizing to scandals of the past but defiant it the role of the industry. >> i think there's so much misinformation out there that's used aggressively by people for their own purposes. we provide a service to you. we make a little money every time we do it. that's what happens. >>> and ceo confidence down for a third year in a row according to a survey here. despite markets hitting multiyear highs with lack of decisions in the u.s. weighing on sentiment. >>> okay, hello and welcome to the start of our coverage from the annual meeting of the world economic forum here in davos. day one of three come. kelly, i could
, says his country will hold a referendum before the end of 2017. that's on whether to stay in the eu. he announced this amid growing calls to leave the european brock, sparked by the ongoing european debt problems. >> i am not a british isolationist, but i do want a better deal for britain. but not just about a deal for britain. i want a better deal for europe too. so i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future for the european union, a future in which britain wants and should want to play a committed and active part. >> cameron emphasized that britain should not leave the eu. he insists that staying is the country's best interest. >>> romanian police have arrested three men suspected of stealing paintings by picasso, monet and other greats from a dutch museum last year. the missing works have not been recovered. the three suspects are romanian nationals. they are accused of making off with seven paintings from the museum in rotterdam. the works include pieces by pablo picasso, claude monet, matisse and gogan. the combined values is in the tens of millions o
a referendum before the end of 2017 on whether to stay in the eu. he announced this amid growing calls to leave the european bloc sparked by the ongoing eurozone debt problems. >> i am not a british isolationist. but i do want a better deal for britain. but not just a better deal for britain. i want a better deal for europe too. so i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants and should want to play a committed and active part. >> cameron did emphasize britain should not leave the eu. he insists that staying is in the country's best interests. >>> the japanese government has revised upward its overall assessment of the country's economy for the first time in eight months. the upgrade was due to an improvement in business sentiment stemming from a weaker yen and also higher stock prices. in the monthly report for january released wednesday the government says signs of bottoming out can be seen in some areas of the country's economic activity. that is an improvement from its previous evaluation which stated the ec
$2.6 million a day. that is a lot of money. discussions will continue. $67 million from the eu. japan will pledge $120 million -- japan will pledge and money for humanitarian needs. >> that is an important aspect. thank you very much. passenger plane has crashed near kazakhstan. local media are reporting at least 20 people died when the aircraft came down in bed at weather. thousands of protesters have ignored a curfew imposed by the egyptian president. the opposition has refused the call for talks. have more -- we have more. >> was violence on the anniversary of one of the bloodiest days of the revolution. teargas covered downtown cairo with plumes of smoke. .hey've not held back a general was held hostage. these angry young men and women -- the opposition blocked -- the national front had six specific demands starting with the formation of a government and cancelling all the consequences of the desperation. >> was urged to stand his ground. >> no person or front has the power to force anything on the elected president. nobody should be able to implement any agendas or conditions for
.k., the british finance minister, george osbo e osborne, wants the e.u. to toughen bank regulation across the 27 member states. britain's set plans in motion to separate retail investment decisions in part on proposals from the finnish central bank governor. the fed is also reportedly considering a plan to help banks avoid costly regulations aimed at preventing derivatives trading from being subsidized by taxpayers. the "financial times" says it stems from the lincoln amendment, included in the 2010 dodd-frank law. it prohibits banks that have access to federal deposit insurance or fed credit from acting as derivatives dealers. u.s. banks will still be able to trade some products like interest rate swaps. under the rule, foreign banks would be forced to move their u.s. derivatives activities off their books. >> yeah. if you followed that, you get a gold star this morning. it's a tricky one. >> there's a law that means foreign banks will have problems trading derivatives in the united states. >> charlie, any thoughts here? >> you know, it's part of this broad regulatory framework being put in pla
was ordered. the e.u. and u.s. have criticized ukraine's handling of the case. now it's a big weekend in german politics with a major regional election taking place in lower sacks any on sunday. angela merkel and the struggling partner of the free democrats against the opposition social democrats and allies and everyone will be looking for pointers in which chancellor merkel will be trying to win a third term in office. >> hanover mayor is determined to unseat the incumbent. >> we are very, very close to a change of government here in lower sacks any. now let's get to work we won't give this away anymore. let's get out and fight, dear friends. >> the local democrats have sent in party these win over undecided voters. >> he will win together with the greens and that's a good thing. peek in lower saxoni worked well together. >> simple messages and fame otherwise faces are also the strategy. angela merkel made several appearances for david mcalister. >> he is a great state premiere so, do all you can do to ensure david can say i can continue to serve lower saxony together with my team. t
as the eu politics are, they're on their way to unified banking regulation in the eurozone. their crisis fund has stabilized. it's not going to be pretty and it's going to take a couple of years still, but we are on our way to a stronger and more unified eu, with or without britain over time. >> what do you think? >> a little bit too positive to me. i would say europe is probably not coming apart. different said statement than europe is coming together. i think the reason it probably won't come apart is greece, not france. sooner or later, that is the real test. the president of france is taking france in directions that are truly unsustainable economically. but for germany, it's one thing if greece were to leave, but for france, it can't leave. if you're germany, that's the whole core, the whole concept, the dynamic of post-world war ii european integration. germany will go to great lengths, i think really whatever lengths it takes to keep france in. europe will survive but economic growth is not going to take off, it's still going to be extremely weak because it doesn't have in place a
the bailout. that was an incredible show of will. halting and clumsy and awkward as the eu politics are, they're on the way to banking regulation in the euro zone. it's not going to be pretty and it's going to take a couple years still, but we are on our way to a stronger and more unified eu with or without britain over time. >> what do you think? >> too positive to me. europe is probably not coming apart. different said statement than europe is coming together. the reason it probably won't come together is not greece, it's france. sooner or later, that is the real test. the president of france is taking france in directions that are truly unsustainable economically. france can't leave if you're germany because that's the whole core, the whole dynamic. the relationship. germany will go to great lengths, really, whatever lengths it takes to keep france in. europe will survive but economic growth is not going to take off, still extremely weak because it doesn't have in place any of the prerequisites. >> the head of morgan stanley had a piece where he said that europe is actually going to bounce
fuel. >> it is. it is not an end to solution to climate change. we tried for 20 years with kyoto and e.u. wanted to do a lot of good. i'm from europe. we ended up paying 20 or $30 billion to cut carbon emissions what you guys have done, done it for free. actually you've made money doing it because you also got cheaper energy. that is the way forward. also for china and india and everyone else. melissa: that is the argument too, a lot people proponents of solar and wind whatever don't want to hear. while fracking has been profitable it has helped the environment. at the same time you look at things like there was this big story today out of wyoming where encana is drilling and there's a well is contaminated one way or the other. seems like it from the reports. they're dealing with all this. the neighbors in the neighborhood are saying pavilion, wyoming, this is a sult of the fracking going on nearby. there is a case they would point to saying it is bad for the environment. >> listen there is nothing just fine. fracking also has its problems. we should dinitely have it well-regulated. most
the e.u. to impose sanctions on hezbollah, and you have been a believer that we should not do it alone, we should do with unilateral. what we do take the chance and urged the european union to sanction has a lot? is we shouldn insurer swer not be writing lesser proof, i think the president is the appropriate official. >> and congress has no interest in whether the e.u. would be sanctioned as a terrorist or a station? >> the congress has a responsibility in a lot of things. >> that me ask you this about the iranian revolutionary guard. he said a minute ago you think they are a terrorist recession. do you agree? bailout yes. >> and you voted against the amendment designating them as a terrorist organization because they are recognized as a state? iran, you would not want to designate the army of a recognized as a terrorist? >> i just clarify a statement on iran being a recognized nation by the nine nations, by most world bodies. the reason why i did not vote as 22 other members that because i think jim webb's argument was a strong argument, and that is we have -- and this is what he said
. defended dialogue with hamas. refused to join in a letter calling on e.u. to condemn hezbollah. he had a pejorative comment to jewish lobby. he has taken stances that indicateed he is less than supportive of the relationship with israel. >> there are two key democrats that could factor in how this goes. one is new york democratic senator schumer. >> he is staying quiet on the fight. talk about the real oppositio opposition. i think there will be some tough hurdles to get over with republicans. but i don't think there is enough democratic fight to stop the nomination. out of loyalty to the president who don't want him appointed will vote for him. >> bret: john kerry, fair to say he has an easy ride? >> yeah. it's an opportunity to get questions answered on benghazi or put it front and center in how the future of the state department will be run. no, i don't think there is any problem with him. >> bret: you agree, carl? >> it's interesting hearing. i agree that the committee means he gets approved but he will be asked about benghazi and about the basic tenets. and he will go on about the
to israel, but what they pose to america. when they call on the eu to designate hezbollah terrorist organization. they cite the damage that hezbollah has done to american military men and women and american security interests and for steve to just, you know, like sweep this away is, this is just israel and israel supporters wanting a bunch of love letters is really, i'd say, actually, offensive. if you look -- why is ben carden. senior democrat in a democratic conference. he came out today. so, this is a senior democrat knowing that the president of his party is about to nominate chuck hagel for secretary of defense and ben carden is raising serious questions. yet, another democrat to raise questions. what is giving them pause? i don't think it's as simple as steve just dismissed it. these love letters or disagreement over some love letters to israel. real national security issues at stake. senator hagel was opposed to sanctions against syria. one of a handful of sanctions -- >> i want to get steve to respond to you on that. i want to throw in this issue. what is a bigger issue for
is qualifying for e.u. bail-out money. 2013 is bringing more protests. young and old in athens. unemployment in greece is higher than spain. and pensions are slinking. >> we are rapidly going backwards. far backwards. the only battle is the battle on the street. >> greece is trying to keep a lid on things. mass transit strike in the second week. officials say they will jail workers if they don't go back on the job. greeks are tired. this is a hassle but what can we do? >> this is watched by the u.s. wall street buffeted by the european trouble. washington planning austerity moves and taxes and all are hoping what has happened in europe isn't a preview of years to come. bret? >> bret: greg palkot in london. thanks. >>> you have heard the talk is cheap. the promises are not. concerns entitlements and how to pay for them. jim angle says the president didn't shed light on that earlier in week. >> treated like innellis. he had several issues in inaugural address but one in particular stuck out to some. comment about entitlement. s. >> the commitment we make to each other, through medicare and soc
the sum total of all of your votes, refusing to sign a letter to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to guard terrorist terrorist organization, one of two to vote on sanction this body tried to make on iran and the statements you made after palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all of that together, that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> i would not agree with that. if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, vote to say the iranian revolutionary guard was terrorist organization would you vote no? >> times change. it recognize that. yes, i would reconsider. >> thank you. that encouraging. >> bret: interesting exchange with lindsey graham. back with the panel. you talk about senator graham's exchange with chuck hagel. >> now that we have shown everyone how spontaneous and non-rehearsed we, are i was thinking of the tape where he quotes hagel saying the jewish lobby has intimidated senators in to voting
that climate change may be happening. we don't know to what degree, and, you know, the e.u. wants to spend $250 billion, but it only movedded the needle lower on the temperature by one degree fahrenheit. the point being is what's the best way to go about this? do we just throw money at the problem when you have big companies like ge and morgan stanley, you know, at the table, ready to benefit from it, or do you do what the utilities are doing, methane, carbon capture. >> a multiprongedded approach. at the end of the day, we can want afford to be on the wrong side of history on this or live life in the short term. this is an absolute concern. at the end of the day, face it, the market is worth $6 trillion. we want a piece of that in america. liz: what do you think? >> we do, but now is not the right time. we have to get the market back to creating jobs, talking less than 150,000 on a monthly basis, 8% unemployment, and the government needs to redistrict focuses to get the economy back online rather than focusing on clean energy right now. liz: phil, is north korea and iran or climate change the
for sanctions in syria. he wouldn't sign a letter to the eu to designation hezbollah a terrorist organization. if he does have a problem here, jonathan, is it going to be that republicans have made the argument he's beyond the mainstream or something we don't know about yet. >> it could be one or the other. that's why the confirmation hearings are going to be vitally important. right now as you said at the top of the show, both sides, the pro-hagel people and anti-hagel people are engaged in a bit of a campaign to sort of set of narrative for who this person could be as secretary of defense. before he sits before the confirmation hearings and answer questions, tough questions from democrats and republicans alike, on all of these issues from his support of israel to his criticisms of the iraq war, the afghanistan war, the -- his unwillingness to sign that letter designating hamas as a terrorist organization, these are all questions he's going to have to answer and how he answers them could very well determine whether he's confirmed or not. >> well, he started to answer them a little bit. he di
of your votes, refusing to sign a letter to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to designate the iranian revolutionary guard a terrorist organization, being one of two on two occasions to vote against sanctions that this body was trying to impose on iran, the statements you made about palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all that together. that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to our enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> no, i would not agree with that. because i have taken actions and made statements very clear as to what i believe hezbollah and hamas are as a terrorist organizations. >> if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, to vote to say that the iranian revolutionary guard was a terrorist organization. would you still vote no? >> the reason i voted no to start with... >> well i know why, you told me that. my question is would you reconsider and would you vote yes this time? or would you still vote no? >> times change. i recognize that an
123450eu6789. >> schieffer: you're favoring getting out of there. >> the quicker the better. >> schieffer: should we leave a residual force there of some kind. >> bob i would think i've been there twice now as a governor and as a u.s. senator and i believe we have some strategic especially the force base. that's a tremendous opportunity strategic point for us to launch from to protect our troops for our special forces to operate out of. i would did he ever to the experts -- defer to the experts and professionals on that. we have this war on terror not just from our generation but our children's and grandchildren's. we have to be able to strike at terror before it strikes us. >> schieffer: i don't think there's any question we have denied al-qaeda a save haven in afghanistan but they now have a safe haven in pakistan. what do we do with pakistani. >> i approve of the jones strikes there. i'm one that says we should use all the technology we have to protect america and americans without putting them in harm's way. that's been very effective. we've been able to strike and tak
to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to designate the iranian revolutionary guard a terrorist organization, being one of two on two occasions to vote against sanctions that this body was trying to impose on iran, the statements you made about palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all that together. that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to our enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> no, i would not agree with that. because i have taken actions and made statements very clear as to what i believe hezbollah and hamas are as a terrorist organizations. >> if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, to vote to say that the iranian revolutionary guard was a terrorist organization. would you still vote no? >> the reason i voted no to start with... >> well i know why, you told me that. my question is would you reconsider and would you vote yes this time? or would you still vote no? >> times change. i recognize that and, yes, i would reconsider. >> well, t
don't know to what degree and, you know the e.u. wants to spend $250 billion but it only movedded the needle lower on the temperature by one degree fahrenheit. the point being is what's the best way to go about this? do we just throw money at the problem when you have big companies like ge and morgan stanley, you know, at the table ready to benefit from it or do you do what the utilities are doing, methane carbon capture. >> a multiprongedded approach. at the end of the day we can want afford to be on the wrong side of history on this or live life in the short term. this is an absolute concern. at the end of the day, face it the market is worth $6 trillion. we want a piece of that in america. liz: what do you think? >> we do but now is not the right time. we have to get the market back to creating jobs talking less than 150,000 on a monthly basis 8% unemployment, and the government needs to redistrict focuses to get the economy back online rather than focusing on clean energy right now. liz: phil is north k
a positive or more negatively? >> pakistan sees a positive role for the eu, united states, other organizations, international organizations. but what is the role that nader sees for itself? is it military when we talk about nato? or is it economic? or is it political? i think nato doesn't appear to where so many hats. basically, when we talk about nato we're talking about military. well, that i think has already been discussed. but certainly the eu, other organizations, the united states, really has very important political role, economic role. i think afghanistan -- i think nader can also help support the iran army to do a better job with its resources. so we are in favor of that, this kind of role. there was one mentioned about india and transatlantic trade comments it appeared that also comes -- there are so may things that can be done if only the conflicts situation gets resolved, and also in the border area with pakistan. >> ambassador jawad, nato's will? >> yes, particularly i think your question was on nato's role through northern afghanistan. i think this is a key importa
by the eu, the judge has been sanctioned by the eu. bill: he has a tough, tough reputation too this judge has, and the trial just startek. and his wife is on record as saying that everything that is coming out of there this week is a flat-out lie. what is the motivation beyond iranian media putting this word out, when in fact it's not the case. you're saying now this guy is still in jail, he's behind bars. >> he's in jail, he's facing abuse while he's in prison. and the iranian regime, the revolutionary garcia is trying to utilize the internal media to in order to tamper down any kind of global outreach that is going on media wise. what the iranians are doing through their media is no, no, no we are letting him out in a few days. meanwhile they are beating him. bill: torture. >> this is one of the worst prisons, eye rain and prisons. the media is utilizing a distortion campaign. it's called media advocacy. we are putting up the true facts, iran is distorting it to tamper down media significant in what is becoming a dangerous by the moment situation for the pastor and his family. he's 32 y
, intergovernmental cooperation destroys responsibility and accountability. look at the e.u.. did the e.u. destroy greece, or did greece destroy the e.u.? it's probably both, but you can't tell, and they all blame each other. and the founders didn't need the e.u. to see these dangers. all of this arises from intergovernmental cooperation and commandeering. the founders didn't need the e.u. because they have the example of commandeering in front of them. it was the articles of confederation. and so they wrote a constitution that prohibits this and makes it very, very difficult in any event. the second objection to justice breyer or, rather, the objection to his second point is, well, if the feds want to send swarms of officers, let them try. as angela already suggested, they can't, and they won't, and if they do, they will have to pay the fiscal and political price. so i think in a weird way it would actually be great if we had fbi agents in santa clara breaking down the doors of gravely-ill pot smokers. that'll tell people more about the federal government than 15 papers from the cato institute. [
proposal, set forth by the uk independent commission on banking and the eu's group. sir john vickers, chairman of the independent commission, has argued criticized the coalition government and the backing away from his original proposal. while the european commission's recent report summarizes the responses received and it acknowledges the widespread opposition of a proposal in a determinedly understated action. it argues that a compelling case for mandatory separation of trading activities hasn't been made. they felt that the proposal is not backed by the required evidence and that there was a need for thorough impact assessment. with all due respect my to my friends in the european financial regulatory community, what a regulatory proposal is used within the eu, considered too harsh on the financial industry and harmful to markets, it's a clear sign that it's time to take a step back and reevaluate. regardless of what happens respect to the proposals, even if all of the most vitriolic allegations set forth are true, even if our financial giants act solely and ruthlessly out of self
trying to convince the e.u. to designate hezbollah as a global terrorist organization. this will be some interesting hearings and i think the senate will ask some pretty tough questions. jenna: to generalize that that that is interesting because it is about being able to name who our enmy -- enemies are in a broad context. general scales, senator kerry and senator hagel, both vets and supporters of the military and critics of the military as well. how do you have the two vets in high positions potentially? what would that mean? >> that's a great question. first of all i tend to support the person over the policy. i testified before senator hagel's committee in 2007 over the surge and i talked with him at length after my testimony. i will tell you this. one thing that struck me about him is enormous empathy for the american soldier. and as the military draws down he is going to be a person i think who maintains the trust and the compact that the government has with our returning veterans from iraq and afghanistan. so here's a buy who has seen war, who understands the nature and character
that he felt that american television programming certainly appear in the '70 z, '70s, '0eu89d had a positive event demonstrating american vawms to the world. how do you think the world outside the united states show "24" and "homeland" and what effect do you think -- have you heard anything at all? >> yeah. "24" and "homeland" are extraordinarily popular not just in germany and in the u.k. but also in jordon, turkey, and places you, you know, frankly "24" is a huge knit iran. it's being beamed in illegally by i can't remember the name. >> you're not getting paid for it. >> right. i'm not getting paid for it, no. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. yeah. we heard it from -- [inaudible] >> >> yeah. >> and the actor who plays a character is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking . >> butt thing . >> tracking "homeland" in iran. >> and surprise stunningly popular. statement i have read a few criticisms of the show, and again, to the extend we sort of, i think, make piss people off on every side of the aisle and embraced too. tvs a good thing. i think one thing
barack obama and the eu, i think even hillary clinton would agree at this point, what difference does it make? which, by the way is going to be her campaign slogan in 2016. the nobel peace prize should go to people who risk their lives and doing heroic work and whose efforts will be magna advertised by recognition from this award. hillary clinton does not risk her life. she does not do heroic work. i have been waiting all day to hear from mr. garland nixon about what she has done for any tangible effort at peace whatsoever. >> garland, let us know? what do you think? >> a couple of things. first of all with former president clinton, if you look at the clinton foundation, they have donated upwards of $30 million to haiti since the earthquake. they have been responsible for literally millions of people getting -- in africa getting medication for h.i.v. and aids. it's hard to question the clinton foundation and what they have done. >> what about hillary? secretary clinton i should say. >> one of the important things she has done is taken the state department in a fundamentally different
. 89 senators voted for it. he voted against it. a letter to the eu asking the eu to designate hezbollah a terrorist organization. 88 senators signed it. he was one of the ones who didn't. when there was a letter to russia asking to deal with the rising tide of anti-semitism in russia. 99 senators signed the letter, one did not, chuck hagel. he has the right to have those interviews but there is a bipartisan consensus in washington illustrated by the math outside it. the question is why does the president want that in the discussion? why does he want that person with those judgments running the pentagon at this time? those are important questions to be explored during the hearing. >> he should have the opportunity to answer that. he has made clear on matters that impact israel the most in a positive way, i would not have been on the side of senator hagel in those votes, important to answer it and important to look at his entire record. on the things that matter most with u.s. policy and our great ally, israel, he has been as responsible as any when it comes to financial support
british voters to decide whether or not they should exit the eu by 2017. cameron argued for continued membership but in a more streamlined european union with fewer restrictive regulations. >> from our parade of papers, "the omaha world herald," the governor of nebraska has given the okay for the keystone pipeline to run through his state effectively leaving the decision now of whether or not to green-light the 1700-mile project to the obama administration. the president has pushed back a decision on the project until after march, but the pipeline's future remains in doubt as president obama rejected a plan a year ago, you'll recall, saying the legislation didn't give enough time for the government to give it a thorough review. >> and you know, michael steele, we were talking this morning about how the republicans move forward in a more thoughtful, strategic way. still being tough. >> yeah. >> you can be tough. you can be conservative. you can still be smart. >> be smart. that's right. >> we haven't been smart. a guy who has been smart, chris christie. new quinnipiac poll numbers out
to -- ountries that aspire to ascendancy in the eu. progress there will continue american leadership. i hope we will continue to work again to the region to ensure -- in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. thank you for your leadership of the european foreign subcommittee. i look forward to working with a. -- you. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement in response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience. i would've enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i will enjoy working with you as secretary of state. these are complex issues, these are dangerous times. i grew up helping politics at the water's edge and was true. -- hoping that that maxim that politics ends at the water's edge was true. i believe we share the same goals. we want a secure, prosperous america. i think that starts being open and honest with each other. i hate to go back to yesterday's news and by yesterday when i was asking a relatively simple question, secretary clinton's reaction was "what difference a
that aspire to ascendancy in the eu. progress there will continue american leadership. i hope we will continue to work again to the region to ensure they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. thank you for your leadership of the european foreign subcommittee. i look forward to working with a. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement in response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience. i would've enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i will enjoy working with you as secretary of state. these are complex issues, these are dangerous times. i grew up helping politics at the water's edge and was true. i believe we share the same goals. we want a secure, prosperous america. i think that starts being open and honest with each other. i hate to go back to yesterday's news and by yesterday when i was asking a relatively simple question, secretary clinton's reaction was i think it makes a big difference. i think it matters a great deal at the american people get the truth. i think they have the right to be told the
. you made a great point here, it is highly contagious, it's more contagious than the tphrao*eu. another thing it has in common with the flu is it changes rapidly it mutates. this year's strain is not the same as last year's strain. when you have a new strain you get twice as many cases. this is a very problematic thing. it's going to spread all over the country. i want the people out there to distinguish the symptoms. if you're feeling the vomiting, nausea, the diarrhea this is the n o noro virus. bill: you say it starts in utah. >> it's having huge out breaks in nursing homes and churches in utah. my guess is that somebody flew over from england or wales to utah bringing it there. plane flights spreads this incredibly rapidly. bill: if that is the case you have to wash your hands, man, that is your defense number one is it not? >> right, the flu is the respiratory virus. this one you get by touching sur tpaes, eac surfaces, touching food, you need to stay away from people when you're actually sick with this. bill: keep the fingertips out of your eyes. you see people doing that, that is
kerry would be a very effect t*eu secretary of state because he could carry out president obama's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to te
pleated, we still have those countries that aspear to ascend ancy into the e.u. i would just urge you that further progress in that area is going to continue to require american leadership. i hope that we will continue to work in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. i just want to thank you for your leadership of the european affairs subcommittee you've done a tremendous job working on it and i look forward to working with you. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement and your thoughtful response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your global experience, your depth of knowledge in these areas. i would have enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee and i'm going to enjoy working with you as secretary of state. as you said, these are complex issues and these are dangerous times. i certainly grew up hoping that that maxim of politics ends at the water's edge was actually true. i'm not sure it ever was but it's something to aspear to. we have the same goals, we want a prosperous and secure am
leverage the market. there has been some talks about a u.s.-eu partnership. i do not know if that can become reality. we need to think about not creating a threat where there is not one. understand carefully where we can find the basis of better cooperation. i want someone saying, kerry has a mistaken notion of what china is doing. i am not saying you do not have to be careful and understand where it is going. i am not talking about retreating from our current levels. i am trying to think about how we do this in a way that does not create the reaction you do not want to create. >> senator mccain. >> your 29 years of service is a great example for those of us newcomers. i thank you for that. in the opening round of russian --assurance, we raised issues about the western hemisphere. i worry that our firm -- our foreign policy has been very oriented east-west. the north-south access is important. i worry about the chinese being all over the americas. in a time -- we could see our influenzae road. i hope that the state department has that north-south access as they keep focus. your openin
ol skr*eus tha anesthesiologist that puts people to sleep and wakes them up for a living. they say consolidation is very important and it happens while we are sleeping. what is it? >> husbands can now use this as an excuse as to why they forgot to take the trash out because they didn't get a good night sleep. whaoeufpl we are sleeping the brain is working and it's working on over time to consolidate memories. what this means is that things that we encounter during the day, conscious or subconscious they get processed in networks or frame works within the brain. they get sorted based upon some common patterns and they also get stored and downloaded, similar to when you back up your computers. it's a process that will store all the memory that you need to have. jaime: let's say you're not a good sleeper. >> absolutely. jaime: how bad a shape are you in, then? jaime: what they've been showing is that the brain basically functions on delta waives during deep sleep and normally right now when we're talking we are having alpha and beta waves which are fast low voltage waves. when you get
refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, i did vote against it. >> i
total of all of your votes refusing to sign a letter to the eu, asking has a lot to be designated as a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to designate the iranian revolutionary guard as a terrorist organization, being one of two to vote against sanctions this body was trying to impose on iran, the statements you have made about palestinians and the jewish lobby -- all of that together, that the image you have created is one of sending the worst possible signal to our enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> no, i would not agree with that because i have taken actions and made statements very clear as to what i believe hezbollah and hamas are as terrorist organizations. >> if there was a vote on the floor of the senate this afternoon to label the iranian national -- revolutionary guard, the people that killed soldiers in iraq, some of the most vicious people to the people of iran themselves, if there was a vote would you still vote no? >> i would want to know from the president what they were doing. ask i mean you read the paper, you w
organization by the united states and in 2006 he was only one of only 12 senators who refused to write the eu asking them to declare hezbollah a terrorist organization. why did he do that? >> chuck hagel is his own man. he wears no man's collar and he will continue to be his own man. that is the kind of person you want as secretary of state, when you're in the room deciding about war and peace. you want somebody to give their honest opinion. chuck hagel's opinions can come out in the hearings and the american people can decide. there's no question about the fact that the senate i think will ultimately confirm by an overwhelming majority chuck hagel as secretary of defense because nobody is going to really seriously consider violating the president's choice here in the middle of a war, in the middle of a shooting war. >> senator cleland, it's good to see you. thank you so much for joining us. >> thank you. >>> on monday the president said his cia nominee, john brennan, helped him create the strategy that has devastated the leadership of al qaeda. senior correspondent john m
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